Tibetan Rapberry

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Tea of the Day: Tibetan Raspberry by Xanadu Tea

Description: Highlighted with real raspberry for additional color and flavor, this tea is a real treat from the secret garden.

Dry tea smells like warm raspberries with a stronger smell behind it, something like you might expect having just picked berries in your own garden.

Steeped tea smells very similar to the dry, but with a touch more depth and bite

Liquor is a chestnut brown in the cup.

You can absolutely taste the raspberry, which is great because often flavored teas that do not have pieces of the source of the flavoring do not match their smell. It’s very drinkable without sugar but adding sugar does not detract from the flavor or diminish the pleasantly smoky finish. It also tastes like it would take milk well, although I did not try it.

Tea Rating: 4/5


I live a life where I know that dreams can come true.

I know this because some of them have.

I day dreamt about the perfect place for my fiance and best friend could live together without too much wanting to kill each other (even in my dreams I know that relationships are never exactly perfect). And, a year ago, we found it and secured it.

I’ve spent many hours of my teen and adult life dreaming about a truly good romantic relationship, one that will last through good times and rough patches alike; I’ve recently celebrated two years with the man I’m going to marry next year.

Because of these, and many other smaller dreams and goals I’ve met or achieved, I find that my dreams are expanding.

I dream about the wedding itself, and the honeymoon, and at least one awesome vacation I’d like to go on with my future husband.

But, and I think more importantly, I dream of the bigger things I’ve never before considered could be a reality.

Some of them are a little more grounded, like the one about becoming a counselor a bit later in life and helping people work through life’s pains and hopefully come out stronger people. Because of where I work getting the degrees required for that dream is a very possible thing.

Others a little more outlandish, like traveling the world pulled by my camera to take pictures of all the beautiful things, even the ones that are a little sad as well.

Who knows, though? Maybe both of those things will someday come true. And in the meantime, it’s fun to dream

 


Life is full of beauty. Notice it. Notice the bumble bee, the small child, and the smiling faces. Smell the rain, and feel the wind. Live your life to the fullest potential, and fight for your dreams.”Ashley Smith

True Blueberry

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Tea of the day: True Blueberry by Celestial seasonings

Description: Some tastes are so familiar that just hearing their name brings their flavor to mind – like True Blueberry®, whose simple, fruity flavor is best described as ‘tasting blue.’ The wild blueberries we chose for this blend have overtones of purple grapes, providing a deeper berry flavor than their farmed cousins.

Dry tea smells like a handful of fresh blueberries from the patch, warm and sweet with a bit of sharp

Liquor is a deep vibrant pink in the cup

Steeped tea has a brighter blueberry smell, naturally sweet. Makes me think of fresh blueberry pie, in fact.

Tart, then sweet, full berry flavor that is still mellow enough to be drunk without any sugar.

Adding sugar, however, seems to amp up the intensity of the flavor, so if you really like blueberry, one sugar cube really gives the brew a kick.

Tea Rating: 4/5


Today we’re going to talk about the value of taking breaks.

Most of us have some kinds of “regular” job, one where you work probably 5 days a week, with an expected number of hours worked in a given day, probably 8.

In those work days we all have allotted break times. It seem that the standard (on your 8 hours of work type jobs) is two fifteen minute breaks that you’re paid for and one one-hour “lunch” break that you are not.

Those of us that work a regular job such that I describe tend to take our breaks, as much as possible. Our lunch breaks for sure, if nothing else.

These structured breaks are alright, but maybe not the best thing in the world, because they do leave us expected to be focused on task for chunks of time that are 2 to 4 hours long….and the human brain just doesn’t do that thing very well.

We can certainly train ourselves, but there is a reason why an 8 hour work day leaves us tired but not sleepy whereas a weekend hiking leaves us feeling rested even though we are physically exhausted. Our brains were evolved on the move, so jobs that keep us moving and have tasks that can be completed in an hour or less tend to be some of the best for us.

My job, for example, has one of the two: the longest project I’ve worked on thus far has taken about 4 hours, and in a typical day I get multiple short projects that last from about 30 minutes to about an hour total work time. The rest of the time is spent solving customer issues, and I am the happiest I’ve ever been in a work environment ever.

Another benefit of my job is that it is totally fine to get up and walk away from my desk for a few minutes, and is in fact encouraged. So, when I start feeling edgy, I get up and move. Simple as that

But then we go home, and we do other work, and a lot of the time don’t treat ourselves even half as well as the people we work for who are required to do so by law.

How many of us go to work and then come home and work on homework for hours on end without a break?

How often have you spent an entire day doing yard-work without taking anything more than a pee break?

Seriously though, we really should treat ourselves better than our employers do; sometimes it seems like we feel like we have to cram as much as possible into our “free” time, like if we’re not getting paid we can’t waste a second.

But I argue that we are getting paid: not in money but in life experiences…and at least half the time, rigidly partitioning out our non-work time makes it so that nothing of note happens.

Live a little, cut out that schedule for your evenings and days off and just go with the flow, wherever you can.

Thai Tea

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Tea of the Day: Thai Tea by Summit Spice and Tea

Description: This is our version of the traditional blend, and is delicious hot or iced, black and with cream and sugar

Dry tea smells sweet and spicy, slightly of licorice

Liquor is a reddish caramel color in the cup

Tea has a similar spicy/licorice smell, but with a bit more spice

Tea tastes like it smells, sweet and spicy, with a woodsy tone, both with and without sugar. Sugar does bring up the licorice hint, though

Adding milk makes it smooth and creamy, tastes sweet with warmth that feels like reading a book in the comfiest of chairs

Tea Rating: 4/5


Today just some thoughts about what makes a good job a good job:

Pay and benefits: Obviously, if you are paid well for the job you do, and have benefits that make you feel valued— paid time off, sick leave, retirement fund (this one is a bigger deal than most people realize), health insurance, holiday pay and/or holidays off— then you are more likely to like your job and stay where you are

Hours/schedule: Good pay means very little if you never have the time to enjoy it. A good schedule has consistent days off (same days every week, and together), plus sufficient days off (as in more than one once in a blue moon). People do burn out, and a crazy schedule will often send people looking for another job, even a job with lower pay, just to get a better schedule

Work Environment: This one, sadly, is pretty much impossible to know before you work for a company. It is, more often than not, the deciding factor on whether you stay with a company long-term or seek employment elsewhere. Simply put, this is how you feel about going to work and how you feel when you leave. A work environment is good when you look forward to being at work, when you enjoy your coworkers, feel like you’re valued and appreciated for the work you do, and are still able to stomach the idea of going places after work. A few days (hello, Mondays) where you don’t want to get out of bed in the morning, doesn’t mean a bad work environment…but if you dread the sight of your workplace, it might be time to reconsider where you work.

Those are some general thoughts on what makes a good job a good job, but over the time I’ve spent working, I’ve noticed a few more.

First of all, location is important. When you get your lunch break, are you located somewhere where you can leave you office/workplace during lunch without feeling stress about getting back on time? If not, is the break room pleasant to be in?

One of my personal favorite things about where I currently work is that I can walk to work, and that my walk takes me past trees and flowers and well-maintained landscaping. Part of that is where I live, but if I drove, the drive would be equally nice (minus rush hour traffic, of course)

Another thing can be overlooked when you get a new job is responsibility. Too little, you’re going to be bored and inattentive to the job at hand. Too much, and you’ll feel frazzled or frustrated and unappreciated. Best case senario is having times where you are busy and times where you are less so, for an overall feeling of your day moving along while also still feeling like you’ve accomplished something

So, that said, do you have a good job? If you do, does it sound like what I’ve laid out, or are there other criteria you use to define a “good job”?


The cup of tea on arrival at a country house is a thing which, as a rule, I particularly enjoy. I like the crackling logs, the shaded lights, the scent of buttered toast, the general atmosphere of leisured coziness.” ~P.G. Wodehouse